Dynamat Installation

Dynamat Installation

July 11, 2015 – Dynamat installation

I’ve always planned to install Dynamat Xtreme to help quiet down the Mustang.  As long as I’ve got the car torn back to the sheetmetal, now is definitely the time to do it.  Before I began, though, I wanted to make sure I had a good, solid rust-preventative coating on everything I was going to cover during my Dynamat installation.  Eastwood red rust encapsulator seemed to be the best option, in that it mirrors the factory finish and prevents the spread and formation of rust.  Of course, now that I have a perfect body, I need to be super careful about over-spray, so I spent the better part of a day taping up all the openings and masking off everything.  Then I taped myself into a cocoon of plastic and clad in my painters suit and respirator, I went to work.

A day after that, I started installing the Dynamat in the doors, on the ceiling, on the floors, pretty much everywhere.  The more complete my coverage is, the better the result will be.  One of the most prominent effects of Dynamat is that it makes everything sound more substantial.  The doors don’t sound so tinny when I close them, the outer panels now have a reassuring thud when you knock on them.  Dynamat installation is pretty straightforward.  Peel, stick, roll out the bubbles, repeat.  It cuts easily, it applies easily, and the foil backing slices through your fingers easily.  It’s hard to wear gloves when you’re applying the stuff because you need your nails to peel off the backing paper, but I’d recommend something to protect your thumbs from the three or four slices I experienced…not fun.

Dynamat prices vary widely, I would shop around for the best deal.  Amazon had the best price when I shopped for it.  Between the floors, roof, doors, and firewall, I used 3 boxes of the bulk pack, with a few sheets left over for doing the inside of the door panels once I put the windows back in.