Rubbing Compound to The Rescue

Rubbing compound, rarely used on today’s clear-coat finishes, was, at one time, a miracle cure for paint ailments.  Minor scratches?  Oxidation? Swirl marks? Rubbing compound to the rescue.

I found myself with another 20 minutes last night, so after having just polished the stainless trim, I thought I’d play with rubbing compound a bit and see if I couldn’t clean up an area well enough to see how the finish should look.

Rubbing compound works miracles

The finish on the Disgustang, a custom-order color called “sapphire blue” that was officially available only on Thunderbirds and Shelby GT350’s, is heavily oxidized in the areas that haven’t already begun to show surface rust.  But even then, with a little patience and some compound, I was able to pull out the true color around the headlights and bring back some shine.  Had this car been garaged and the surface rust not set in, this paint would have probably been within the realm of salvageable.  But having been exposed to the harsh California sun day after day for 47 years, even with some extensive rubbing, the fenders wouldn’t yield anything resembling shine or true color.  If the bottom of the trunk lid weren’t in such great shape, I could easily use the rubbed-out headlight surround as a color reference when I get ready to paint the car.

I’ve grown to love the sapphire blue color, and I think it’ll really pop when the car is done if I choose to go down that road.  There are so many red Mustangs out there, I’m hoping I’ll be a little bit different.  However, I’m still a bit conflicted.  I already have a blue car, so I’m kinda covered on the blue front, especially since the interior of this car will be very similar to the one in my other blue car if I go that route.  Ivy green looks hot, but dark colors show everything (scratches, dust, fingerprints) a lot more than lighter colors do.  Ugh.  Decisions, decisions…

 

1 thought on “Rubbing Compound to The Rescue”

  1. One vote for keeping the blue. It’s a great color and unique. Soup it up but keep that history on the color. (I’m sure Heather agrees as it’s her favorite color!)

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